Makassar Place of Interest

Makassar is the capital of the Indonesian province of South Sulawesi. It is the largest city in the region of Eastern Indonesia and the country’s fifth-largest urban centre
after Jakarta, Surabaya, Bandung, and Medan. From 1971 to 1999,

the city was named after one of its subdistricts, Ujung Pandang. The city is located on the southwest
coast of the island of Sulawesi, facing the Makassar Strait. Makassar is not only the gateway of Eastern Indonesia, but also the epicenter of West and East Indonesia,
as well as between Australia and Asia.

Throughout its history, Makassar has been an important trading port, hosting the centre of the Gowa Sultanate and a Portuguese naval base before its conquest by
the Dutch East India Company in the 17th century. It remained an important port in the Dutch East Indies, serving Eastern Indonesian regions with Makassarese fishers
going as far south as the Australian coast. For a brief period after Indonesian independence, Makassar became the capital of the State of East Indonesia, during which
an uprising occurred.
The city’s area is 199.3 square kilometres (77.0 sq mi), and it had a population of around 1.6 million in 2013. Its built-up (or metro) area has 1,976,168 inhabitants covering
Makassar City and 15 districts. Its official metropolitan area, known as Mamminasata, with 17 additional districts, covers an area of 2,548 square kilometres (984 sq mi)
and had a population of around 2.4 million according to 2010 Census.According to the National Development Planning Agency, Makassar is one of the four main central
cities of Indonesia, alongside Medan, Jakarta, and Surabaya. According to Bank Indonesia, Makassar has the second-highest commercial property values in Indonesia,
after Greater Jakarta. At present, Makassar has experienced a very rapid economic growth beyond the average growth rate of Indonesia.

Toraja

Before the 1970s, Toraja was almost unknown to Western tourism. In 1971, about 50 Europeans vis- ited Tana Toraja. In 1972, at least 400 visitors at- tended the funeral ritual of Puang of Sangalla, the highest-ranking nobleman in Tana Toraja and the so-called "last pure-blooded Toraja noble." The event was documented by National Geographic and broadcast in several European countries. In 1976, about 12,000 tourists visited the regency and in 1981, Torajan sculpture was exhibited in major North American museums. "The land of the heavenly kings of Tana Toraja", as written in the exhibition bro- chure, embraced the outside world. In 1984, the Indonesian Ministry of Tourism declared Tana Toraja Regency the prima donna of South Su- lawesi. Tana Toraja was heralded as "the second stop after Bali".

Rammang-Rammang

Rammang-Rammang is a place in the karst mountain range (limestone) in Maros-Pangkep. It settled in Salenrang village, District Bontoa, Maros, South Su- lawesi province, or about 40 km north of Makassar. Rammang-Rammang is can be reached by road with car in less than 2 hours from the city of Makassar. Rammang-Rammang is conveniently located just a few meters from the highway across provinces. The name of "Rammang-Rammang" comes from the lan- guage of Makassar, where rammang means "cloud" or "mist". So, rammang-rammang means a set of cloud or fog. According to the local believe this place was named Rammang-Rammang because of the clouds or fog that always appearing around the area, especially in the morning or when it rains.

Bantimurung

Bantimurung-Bulusaraung National Park is a na- tional park in South Sulawesi in Indonesia. The park contains the Rammang-Rammang karst area, the second largest karst area known in the world after the one in South-Eastern China. The park is in Maros Regency, 50 kilometers to the north of Makassar (one hour drive) or just 20 kilome- ters from Sultan Hasanuddin International Airport (30 minutes drive). Most of the Karst formations are tall and steep at almost a 90 degree angle line along both sides of the road from Maros city to Bantim- urung continuing on up to the Pangkajene and Is- lands Regency (Indonesian: Pangkajene dan Kepu- lauan, commonly abbreviated as Pangkep). The karst area is 43,750 hectares and has 286 caves which includes 16 pre-historic caves in Maros and 17 pre-historic caves in Pangkep. There is waterfall with 2 caves at the national park; the one on the left side is known as the dream cave (one-kilometer long) and the one on the right is known as the stone cave. Riding on the water on blown up inner tubes is a popular activity for children at the site.

Rammang-Rammang

Rammang-Rammang is a place in the karst mountain range (limestone) in Maros-Pangkep. It settled in Salenrang village, District Bontoa, Maros, South Su- lawesi province, or about 40 km north of Makassar. Rammang-Rammang is can be reached by road with car in less than 2 hours from the city of Makassar. Rammang-Rammang is conveniently located just a few meters from the highway across provinces. The name of "Rammang-Rammang" comes from the lan- guage of Makassar, where rammang means "cloud" or "mist". So, rammang-rammang means a set of cloud or fog. According to the local believe this place was named Rammang-Rammang because of the clouds or fog that always appearing around the area, especially in the morning or when it rains.

Samalona Island

Samalona Island has a beach with fne white sand and the sea water that is pure blue. On this island, there are many coconut trees that give dramatic nuance over the beauty. Samalona Island is also famous for the beauty of the underwater. Those who visit this island can do swimming and diving, while seeing the beautiful coral reefs with colorful sea fishes. In addition, the island is also keeps some mysteries about the sinking of ship relics from World War 2. There are at least seven ships were sunk in the area of the island. Among them is the Maru ship (a Japa- nese warships that were sunk at a depth of 30 meters), Lancaster Bomber Ship, Hakko Maru Cargo Ship made in the Netherlands and several other ves- sels. Currently, these vessels has been transformed into a reef and become a home to hundreds of marine life.

Fort Rotterdam

Fort Rotterdam was built on the location of an ear- lier Makassarese fort, called Ujung Pandang. Al- though it has been claimed by some authors that this fort dates back to 1545, there is no direct evi- dence for this. It seems more likely that the fort was built in 1634, as part of a fortification programme that the Makassar rulers undertook in response to a war with the Dutch East India Company (VOC) which broke out in that year. The original fort, Jum Pandan (allegedly named after the pandanus trees growing in the vicinity), gave its name to the city Ujung Pan- dang, another name for the city of Makassar. In 1667 Fort Ujung Pandang was ceded to the Dutch as part of the Treaty of Bongaya, after the defeat of the Sultanate of Gowa in the Makassar War. In sub- sequent years it was entirely rebuilt on the initiative of Dutch admiral Cornelis Speelman, to become the center of Dutch colonial power in Sulawesi. It was renamed Fort Rotterdam after Speelman's place of birth. In the years 1673–1679 it got its five bastions and the 'turtle' shape it still has to this day. This shape gave the fort the nickname "Benteng Penyu" ("sea-turtle fort").

footer